This is the "Home" page of the "PubMed & Google Scholar Tips/Tricks" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

PubMed & Google Scholar Tips/Tricks  

Last Updated: Jul 7, 2016 URL: http://guides.lib.uni.edu/pubmedgooglescholar Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts
Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Google Scholar: Tips/Tricks

1. Use the Rod Library Google Scholar link. This will ensure that citations link to Rod Library subscriptions, and the library's Interlibrary Loan service if needed (that's free for UNI faculty, staff, and students). Alternatively, you can set up your Google Scholar account to link to Rod Library using the Settings > Library Links option. Use your UNI CatID when prompted.

2. Be specific with your keywords. Do some background research to determine the most effective search terms and/or combinations of search terms. Using scientific terms, for example, rather than general terms or slang, will usually mean better results when searching for scholarly sources.

Using the "Cited by" and "Related articles" links below each article can be very useful in gathering many relevant articles quickly. More search tips from Google Scholar are available here.

3. Use limiters. After searching, you'll see options on the left sidebar to limit by date and other criteria. You can also use the Google Scholar Advanced Search to see all limiter options as indicated on the Rod Library Google Scholar page. This allows searching by author, journal, etc.

4. Shop around. No single database has everything. To explore Rod Library subscription databases, see the Databases A-Z or Databases by Subject lists. See also subject guides created by Rod Library librarians.

Keep in mind that Google Scholar (and regular Google) only search the surface web, not the deep web (much larger than the surface web!) that can't be indexed by search engines.

5. Evaluate everything. Not all scholarly articles are created equal, and Google Scholar includes more than just scholarly articles. Consider the author and their credentials (including agencies/offices that collectively author sources), the publication itself (ie. journal), the research methodology, the date of publication, etc.

Want some one-on-one suggestions for your research?  Contact a librarian!  See contact information elswhere on this guide.

More Google Tools

Google Tools
by Angie Cox, Chris Neuhaus - Last Updated Aug 14, 2015
Learn how to make the most of your Google searches.
137 views this year
 

PubMed: Tips/Tricks

PubMed logo

1. Use the Rod Library PubMed link. This will ensure that citations link to Rod Library subscriptions, and the library's Interlibrary Loan service if needed (that's free for UNI faculty, staff, and students).

2. Be specific with your keywords. Do some background research to determine the most effective search terms and/or combinations of search terms. Using scientific terms, for example, rather than general terms or slang, will usually mean better results when searching for scholarly sources.

Using the "Titles with your search terms" link in the sidebar to the right of search results can be very useful in gathering many relevant articles quickly. Learn more about searching PubMed using the resources and tutorials here.

3. Use limiters (aka filters). After searching, you'll see options on the left sidebar to limit by date, article type, and other criteria. The Article types limiter is particularly powerful, allowing you to limit to clinical trials, datasets, systematic reviews, technical reports, and many more options. In the limiter sidebar, use the Additional filters link to add additional options such as language, sex, age, etc.

4. Shop around. No single database has everything. To explore Rod Library subscription databases, see the Databases A-Z or Databases by Subject lists. See also subject guides created by Rod Library librarians.

5. Evaluate everything. Not all scholarly articles are created equal, and PubMed includes more than just scholarly articles. Consider the author and their credentials (including agencies/offices that collectively author sources), the publication itself (ie. journal), the research methodology, the date of publication, etc.

Want some one-on-one suggestions for your research?  Contact a librarian!  See contact information elswhere on this guide.

More PubMed Tools

  • PubMed Commons
    "Enables authors to share opinions and information about scientific publications in PubMed." Comments are searchable. Also includes trending articles based on comments/activity.
  • PubMed tutorials on YouTube
    "Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology. Information including presentations and tutorials about NCBI biomolecular and biomedical literature databases and tools."
  • NCBI tutorials on YouTube
    "Videos from the National Center for Biotechnology." Includes tips for using MyNCBI and other specialized tools.

Your Librarian

Profile Image
Anne Marie Gruber
Contact Info
(319) 273-3711
Spring 2017 Office Hours: most Mondays 1:30-3:30 outside McCollum 201; Tuesdays/Wednesdays 8am-10am in Rod Library 270
Send Email
Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip