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Aldo Leopold Distinguished Lectures @ UNI

Dr. Karen Oberhauser

Dr. Karen Oberhauser

Karen Oberhauser is the Director of the UW-Madison Arboretum. She and her students have conducted research on several aspects of monarch butterfly ecology. Her research depends on traditional lab and field techniques, as well as the contributions of a variety of audiences through citizen science. Her strong interest in promoting a citizenry with a high degree of scientific and environmental literacy led to the development of a science education program that involves courses for teachers, and opportunities for youth to engage in research and share their findings with broad audiences. In 1996, she and graduate student Michelle Prysby started a nationwide Citizen Science project called the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project, which continues to engage hundreds of volunteers throughout North America. Karen has authored over 90 papers on her research on monarchs, insect conservation, and citizen science.

Karen is passionate about the conservation of the world’s biodiversity, and believes that the connections her projects promote between monarchs, humans, and the natural world promote meaningful conservation action. Her current work, and that of her colleagues at the UW Arboretum, continues to promote these connections between humans and our natural environment. She is the chair of the Monarch Joint Venture, and a founding officer of the Monarch Butterfly Fund. In 2013, Karen received a White House Champion of Change award for her work with Citizen Science.

Speaker Series Events

As events are added and updated, we'll add calendar links here:

Events - Dr. Oberhauser

Dwindling numbers for an iconic insect: A conservation biologist ponders moving beyond the documentation of declines

Monarch butterfly populations have been declining over the last 20 years. Because insect numbers are notoriously difficult to assess, and because they often show large annual fluctuations, simply documenting this decline has been a challenge. It is now important to move beyond simple documentation, and toward responding to the challenge posed by monarch conservation, and insect conservation in general. I’ll describe the amazing biology of migratory monarch populations, how citizens and scientists are documenting monarch numbers across their migratory cycle, and then discuss what all of us can do to help preserve this charismatic insect for generations to come.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 ~ Sabin 002 ~  7:00 p.m. ~ Click here to save to your calendar

Lectures and accompanying materials are archived in UNI ScholarWorks:

Readings and Resources - Dr. Oberhauser

Selected news articles:

Selected articles: